Front Kids Bike Seat, Thule Nexxt Mini – FAQs

Front Kids Bike Seat, Thule Nexxt Mini – FAQs

Let us help you to answer all the questions you have about the Front Seat called the Thule Nexxt Mini.

Supporting you to get the right front seat option for your family… so you can smile when you ride.

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What is a Front Kids Bike Seat?

A Front Kids Bike Seat is a seat suitable for riding with your child early, from 1yrs.  It is positioned in front of you – between you and your handlebars. A front seat clicks onto a mounting bracket/adaptor that you attach onto or just below your handlebar stem. It is a fully harnessed seat.

Why choose a Front Kids Bike Seat?

The main advantage with a front kids bike seat is being able to ride early with your young child. The slightly reclined seat is suitable from 1 year of age. These seats achieve the ultimate in interaction with your child seated between your arms sharing the view and experience with you.

The position of the front bike seat with your child between you and the handlebars (in front of your chest) can make some of the skills of riding a little more challenging.  Like mounting, starting/stopping, balance and the reach to the handlebars. As the adult rider you need to feel capable and confident that you can ride safely with a front bike seat.

What riding ability does the Adult Rider need to have?

The position of the front bike seat with your child between you and the handlebars (in front of your chest) can make some of the skills of riding a little more challenging…like. mounting, stopping, balance and your reach around to the handlebars

The more space you have between you and the handlebar the easier these bike skills will be. This can be acheived If you ride in an upright position or if you are tall and ride a large sized frame

If you do not have a lot of space between you and the handlebars… that is you ride in a forward lean position or you have a small bike frame then a front mount child bike seat may not the right solution for you.

What age can you start riding with a child?

This seat is recommended from the age of 1 year and up to 17kg in weight.  To use a Front Seat your child needs to be able to wear a Bike Helmet, see Toddler Helmet and be able to sit unaided. 

What riding environments is the Front Kids Bike Seat best suited to?

When riding with a young child you are best suited to smooth surfaces e.g bike paths, cycleways, groomed off road tracks. You need to feel comfortable about your safety and your child’s safety wherever you choose to ride.

Where does it attach? Is my bike compatible?

The seat clicks down onto an adaptor that is clamped around or just below your handlebar stem.

To attach the mounting bracket/adaptor you require 20mm of space on or under your handlebar stem. Not all bikes have this space. LEARN MORE AT:  Will a Front Kids Bike Seat (Thule Nexxt Mini) Fit my Bike?

It is not compatible with carbon handlebar stems.  It can be very difficult to ride with a front seat on small bike frames if the bike does not put you in a very upright position.

Will there be a anything permanently attached to my bike?

Yes… most riders will choose the mounting bracket/adaptor to be permanently attached to your bike so you can easily, in a few seconds, attach the seat to your bike. However it can be removed if you choose to do so, tools are required.

Can different family members or bikes use one Front Seat?

It can be great to have the flexibility to quickly change your seat from one bike to another.  This allows different members of the family to use the seat on their own bike.  You can purchase additional mounting brackets/ adaptors so the seat can be attached to more than one bike. You just need to ensure that any additional bikes are compatible.

LEARN MORE AT :  Will a Front Kids Bike Seat (Thule Nexxt Mini) Fit on your Bike?

 

What about using with an E-Bike?

It can be a great option to use an E-Bike for riding with a child. If your E-Bike is compatible with the attachment requirements then yes it is a suitable option.

As always be aware of your safety. E-Bikes give you the ability to travel at a much faster speed than you would achieve under your own power.  What does this mean when riding with a young child?  E-Bikes are generally heavier than standard bikes so please consider how this may effect the riding skills you need when riding with a Front Kids Bike Seat.

How much storage space do I need at home?

The front kids bike seat can be left attached to your bike.  It is very easy to remove and is a fairly compact seat. (Seat dimensions in cm, approximately 25W x 20D x40H plus the length of the footrests).  We recommend storage on a shelf or hook to avoid any damage while not in use.

Can I install the Front Kids Bike Seat?

Setting up the seat is easy.  It takes a little more time to attach the mounting bracket/adaptor.  Once set up it is very easy to attach the seat to the adaptor when you choose to ride with your child. We successfully set up the seat and attached the adaptor so we are confident you can too.

LEARN MORE AT:  Attaching a Front Kids Bike Seat

Can I use it to ride with multiple children?

Having the ability to ride with two children can offer more riding opportunities for your family. There are two main things to consider when riding with more than one child…

Can the adult rider ride safely with the added challenge of the weight of two children.  How will this effect your balance and bike handling skills?  Having two children with you can be challenging.  Think about your fitness & strength and the places you want to ride.  You should be a skilled rider to consider doing this.  An E-Bike will help enormously with your enjoyment of riding with two children.

How does the placement of a front seat restrict an attachment of an additional bike seat? If you are wanting to ride with multiple children… the front bike seat offers a good solution as you can have an older child on a rear bike seat or choose a stable towing option.

Multiple Children Options: You can attach a rear kids bike seat or stable towing options: Bike Tow Frame or bike trailers

What do I need to know to ride safely with my child the first time and then for regular riding?

There are some simple things to do and check to keep both you and your child safe when riding with a Front Kids Bike Seat, for the first time, and as it becomes a regular activity for you and your family. Use our resources to help support your enjoyment of riding with this type of seat.

LEARN MORE AT :  Riding Safely with a Front Kids Bike Seat

Want to understand more about options for riding with kids attached to your bike?  Please see our stories, support & solutions below…

Riding stories, support & solutions that will make you & your family SMILE.

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Share your riding outings, adventures and experiences on our quick and easy question and answer forms. Join us in helping others ride bikes. All entries receive a free shipping coupon and go into our seasonal prize draw.

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Mountain Biking – Am I Safe to goRide?

Mountain Biking – Am I Safe to goRide?

Mountain biking is a very rewarding way to ride.  Exploring off road tracks & trails on your bike is a great way to connect with the outdoors and learn new skills.  It can, however, put you at risk.  To be safe, comfortable & confident you need to understand these risks and manage them.

Supporting you and your family to SMILE when you ride.
handlebar bag

Tip One – Wear a Mountain Bike Helmet

Wear a helmet that has been specifically designed for the type of mountain biking you are about to do.  There are helmets that match to all types of abilities, whether you are a beginner, intermediate or advanced rider, downhill rider or racing.  Choose the protection that will give you confidence and the knowledge that you have the correct gear to ride down the trails you choose.

Check out our MTB Bike Helmet Buying Guide

This is a intermediate to advanced mountain bike helmet.

Tip Two – Tools & First Aid

Carrying tools whenever you choose to go for a mountain bike ride is a really important commitment to make to keep you safe.  This becomes even more important as you get further from help – more isolated trails/tour riding.  You should be able to fix a punctured tyre, reconnect a broken chain or adjust a seat or brake lever.  We recommend carrying;

  • Tyre levers, spare tube, mini pump and/or puncture patches
  • Multi-tool with chain breaker and spare chain links

There are multiple ways you can choose to take tools with you.  Seat posts bags are a popular choice.  Tool wraps that can be placed in a backpack and will open up to easily display all your tools are a great idea.  You need to understand how to use what you carry so if you need some help with this please see the following resources we have created;

Five Simple Bike Tasks You Should Know, The Chain Tool – How to Use It, Tools & Kits to Carry, What’s in a Multi Day Tool Kit for Mountain Biking?

Mountain biking does involve a bit of risk.  Riding off road trails requires a certain skill level and is challenging.  This can lead to accidents & falls.  If you are riding further than 30 minutes from help, a new technical trail that will challenge you or with children, we recommend carrying a Compact First Aid Kit designed for bike riders.  When you choose to do any kind of isolated day riding or isolated multi-day/tour riding a first aid kit is an essential piece of gear to carry.  See First Aid for Biking Buying Guide.

Basic First Aid for Bike Injuries

Tip Three – Carrying Gear

What you need to be safe when you ride in mountain bike parks & on trails depends on how far you are going and how isolated you will be.  It is also about the weather and how this weather will affect your body temperature.  Extra things to carry include food, water, clothing (and tools/first aid which we have talked about in the above section).

Food – For most rides under an hour you won’t need food.  Anything over this time or any ride that involves a sustained challenging climb we would then recommend a snack before your downhill.  We always recommend taking food when you ride with children regardless of the time frame.  If your ride is over 2-3 hours this snack should become multiple snacks or a lunch.  Keeping your energy levels high is really important for your enjoyment and your ability to concentrate during the next phase of your riding, which more often than not, when mountain biking, involves a downhill.

Water – What you need to carry depends on a number of things; how far you are going, the access to drinking water, how much you sweat, how hydrated you where before beginning your ride.  For more detail on staying well hydrated please read our Hydration Buying Guide and the story on Hydration – Carrying Water When You Ride.  As a general guide more is better and this is why so many mountain bike riders choose a hydration pack with a bladder – it allows you to carry more water than a drink bottle.

Clothing – Regulating your body temperature and keeping yourself dry is key to keeping safe and enjoying your ride.  Again this becomes more important as you choose to ride further away from populated areas.  Layering is a great tactic.  As you warm up you can take off outer layers.  Or in reverse, as the weather deteriorates you can add protective layers.  Fabrics that have the ability to wick & breath are important so that you and your clothing remains dry.  Often you will be sweaty & hot at the top of a climb.  After resting, to prevent a chilled feeling from airflow on the way down, adding a lightweight/wind protecting jacket or vest is ideal.  The worst combination is being cold & wet this is why we recommend quick dry fabric or merino with breathable but waterproof outer layers. For more on hypothermia and its dangers please read this story.  First Aid & Emergencies When Bike Touring

Tip Four – Protective Padding

While not a choice for all mountain bikers adding protective padding can give you confidence and a feeling of safety.  As you progress with your riding and challenge yourself with technical trails or skills such as jumping, pads will lessen the damage if a fall takes place.  There are pads for elbows or knees and they vary in the level of protection offered.  As the speed of your riding increases the energy from the impact that needs to be absorbed, to keep your limbs safe, increases.  This is why many of the mountain bike specific pads have hard shells.  These shells are often not very comfortable to wear over your knees when you are climbing.

Pads can be a good way to give you or a child confidence after a fall, when you are feeling a bit reluctant to but yourself back on a bike and risk another accident.  Some tracks and some mountain bike parks require you to wear padding. The more rocky or exposed a technical track is the more it makes sense to give yourself extra protection.

See our Kids Protective Padding Page

 

Knee pads designed for mountain biking 

Tip Five – Night Riding

Riding your favourite tracks in the dark is a completely different sensory experience and a great way to keep up your riding all year round.  There are two things to think about to keep yourself safe; warmth & lights.

Warmth – See the section on clothing above for advice on layering and fabrics.  Take special care to keep your extremities warm; fingers, toes & ears.  So think thermal & merino for gloves, socks & headbands or beanies.  Winter Warmth for Riding Combo

Lights – You will need to do a bit of reading & research to understand what is best for what you want to achieve so read our MTB Light Buying Guide.  We recommend both a helmet light & handlebar light for the ultimate night riding set up.  Along with a small rear light.

Tip Six – Comfort & Contact Points

Your comfort while riding is a huge part of enjoying your time on the bike.  It will also keep you protected & safe.  There are three key points where you make contact with your bike.  The seat, the handlebars and the pedals…

Our detailed story on Comfort for Mountain Biking is coming soon…

youth mountain bike helmet

Your bike riding success is different to others… use our stories and support, get the right solutions.

Support and inspire other riders and families to ride

Share your riding outings, adventures and experiences on our quick and easy question and answer forms. Join us in helping others ride bikes. All entries receive a free shipping coupon and go into our seasonal prize draw.

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Do I Need a Special E-Bike Tool Kit to Carry?

Do I Need a Special E-Bike Tool Kit to Carry?

Do E-bikes need special tools that should be carried every time you ride?  Lets explore this question a bit and give you the knowledge you need to ride your E-Bike safely and with confidence.

Supporting you and your family to SMILE when you ride.

If you have joined the thousands of New Zealanders riding an E-Bike you will know how much fun this experience is and what it opens up for you.  Being able to ride further, faster or over challenging terrain (hills) is something that many people have taken too with much enthusiasm.  But like any bike you are vulnerable to mechanical failure and you need to prepare yourself for this.

Bike Tools you should carry with an E-Bike

For the most part you need to be prepared for the same types of things any bike rider experiences.  Flat tyres, seats that need adjustment, bolts that have loosened, chains snapping…  This means tools should be carried that match your needs and ability to help yourself or group.

Tool Kits should get bigger as distance from help increases.  This is just sensible stuff and allows you to ride and be safe.  See our range of Bike Tools Kits to get a better understanding of this. 

The minimum you or someone in your group should be carrying…

  • Spare tube/s or a puncture repair kit
  • A pump
  • Tyre levers – set of 3
  • A simple Allen/Hex Key or basic multi-tool
Choose the correct chamois

What makes an E-Bike different?

Obviously, the main difference to a standard bike is the fact you have a battery.  You can choose to purchase and carry a spare battery with you but for most people this added expense and weight is not practical.  If your battery is charged and performing as it should you will be able to ride wherever you want.  You do need to understand your battery – how far can you ride?  What do the different power levels do to your battery charge level?  If your battery goes flat can you still ride your bike?

Part of choosing to ride a bike with added elements is the commitment to understanding the bike and the specific needs it has.  Regular maintenance and care is important and will increase the life of your bike and lessen the likelihood of problems occurring.  Take advantage of the bike shop you brought your bike from.  They should have the knowledge and hopefully the workshop you need for servicing and more major repairs.

The most common side of the road issue that E-Bike riders face, that is different to a standard bike, is damaged/loose battery cabling disrupting the power to the bike.  This is where tape and cable ties can be very useful in your tool kit for on the go repairs.  If tour riding or riding over multiple days, and your group has the capabilities, you need to consider carrying extra cabling.

Choose the correct chamois

What goRide Recommends:  

Always take tools. If you carry a tool you should know what it is for and how to use it.  Your aim does not have to be a comprehensive fix but a way to safely get home or closer to help. Add some tape and/or cable ties to make your kit more E-Bike specific. 

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Your bike riding success is different to others… use our stories and support, get the right solutions.

Support and inspire other riders and families to ride

Share your riding outings, adventures and experiences on our quick and easy question and answer forms. Join us in helping others ride bikes. All entries receive a free shipping coupon and go into our seasonal prize draw.

goRide supporting women and families to SMILE when you ride

Waterproof or Breathable – Bike Jackets Explained

Waterproof or Breathable – Bike Jackets Explained

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To follow is a list of some of the bike jacket technical terms you may come across when looking at bike jackets.  Knowing what these terms mean will help you to decide whether your bike jacket or jackets need to be waterproof or breathable… or both!  Hope this helps and if you want anything else explained, please get in touch….  CONTACT goRide

OUTER LAYER TERMS – Wind proof, water proof, water resistant, seam sealed, breathable, thermal, reflective, bright

Includes rain jackets, thermal jackets, waterproof trousers

An outer shell or hard shell jacket designed for riding doesn’t do much to actually keep you warm except for keeping out wind. Its primary function is to protect the inside layers of clothing from getting wet.  Most cycling jackets are made up of an outer shell and maybe an inner membrane.  Very few have insulating layers as they are designed for active use not to help keep you warm.

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WATERPROOF

Technically, being waterproof means that it is impermeable to water, no matter how much time it spends in water.  No water in or out. A waterproof jacket will have a coating on the outer fabric called a DWR (Durable Water Repellant).   This will help the garment shed water and prevent saturation.

A garments level of waterproofness is measured in millimetres.  The range between 5,000 mm and 10,000 mm is great for spending long days outdoors through cold and wet weather conditions. It can withstand rains and winds, making it ideal for most outdoor activities including cycling. Waterproof ratings beyond 10,000 mm are excellent.

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BREATHABILITY 

This is a measure of how quickly moisture vapour, generated from your body when you are exercising, is able to pass through a fabric from the inside to the outside environment.  A waterproof jacket that has no breathability will trap all this vapour which will then condense and make you feel damp and sweaty, and potentially cold on a bike.  A jackets breathability will vary depending on the use it was designed for.  As a guide breathability can be measured in g/m2 so depending on the level of activity you want to perform on a regular basis you can buy a jacket that matches.  Most jacket companies will have their own guidelines but to give you a general idea…

  • 5,000 – 10,000g/m²: This level of breathability is fine for light activities, but will get a bit clammy during high-intensity riding or hill climbing.
  • 10,000 – 15,000g/m²: Jackets in this range are suited to more adventurous, moderate to high levels of exercise.
  • 15,000 – 20,000g/m² & above: An extended back country trip, protection in warm climates or otherwise working hard and perspiring heavily will require a jacket this breathable.

Breathability can also be aided with vents, zips, mesh lined pockets.

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What is your activity level?  How important is a breathable jacket?

Bike jacket or vest. Be seen
Control Moisture

Why do you need to control moisture? Once your clothing is wet, in warm conditions, it will lead to chaffing.  In cold conditions, it will lead to hypothermia. The combination of wet clothing & wind is dangerous and riding creates a draft without any help from the actual weather conditions.

WATERPROOF & BREATHABLE

Most waterproof breathable fabrics are layered. This is what distinguishes them from the rest of the jacket options.  The layers will be made from laminate materials, which usually consist of

  • an inner fabric optimised for wicking moisture
  • a waterproof membrane
  • an outer face fabric with a DWR treatment
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Town Poncho information chart. goRide

Layered fabrics are common in waterproof & breathable jackets

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Related Technical Terms:

Seam Sealed – Taping is used to seal the seams in a waterproof jacket on the inside. It does add bulk and reduce a jacket’s breathability.

Water Resistant – This type of jacket will be able to resist the penetration of water to a certain degree but not entirely so is considered water resistant or water repellant or showerproof. It will often bead up rainwater, forming drops on the surface because the surface of the fabric will be treated/coated.  A large range of jackets fall into this category and are generally more budget friendly – cheaper.

Wicking – Allows moisture to move through the fabric weave, pulling it off your skin onto the surface of the fabric to evaporate which is cooling. These types of fabrics have a direction of pull so don’t wear them inside out!

Thermal – A thermal jacket works extremely well as a light jacket for the transitional seasons, but it is also perfect as an insulating middle layer when it is really cold or wet. Thermal jackets can be breathable, windproof and water-repellent, making them practical and suitable for all kinds of weather. See Thermal Jacket

Reflective – Also called Hi-Vis, Protective or Safety Clothing.  It will have one or both of the following properties.  The fabric of the jacket will be made entirely from, or have elements of, high luminescent colour that is easily discernible from any background.  Or it will be considered ‘Reflective’ because it will be reflecting back toward its source any light that plays on it.   This last property works well in strips or bands. See Visibility Jacket / Vest

Thermal Jacket - reflective banding. goRide

A fitted thermal bike jacket for wind or chill protection

Visibility bike jacket - commute or traffic riding

Water resistant, packable & hi-vis bike jacket

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SO, WHAT SHOULD I GET?
Depending on the conditions, activity and personal preference the right jacket will vary for each rider.  See more at The Best Bike Jackets for Cycling in…

Many people only need a water resistant jacket as a windproof outer layer.  This jacket will protect you if you are caught out by rain on your ride.  It will provide an adequate level of protection to get you home or back to the car somewhat dry.

If you need a good all-season jacket for protection from wind & chills while riding then a soft shell thermal jacket will work well. This type of jackets bridges the gap between fleeces and waterproof jackets (or hard shells).  This is a jacket for people who do not intend to ride in the rain.

Waterproof Options:

Commute or urban riders using bikes for transport will generally be looking for jackets with high waterproof ratings where breathability may not be so necessary.  These bike journeys will be short (<1hr) with coverage and protection from the jacket being important.  See Waterproof Poncho for Town Riding 

If you are doing a high level of aerobic activity in the rain then you will want something more lightweight, breathable & waterproof.  Look for higher breathability ratings but lighter weights.  These jackets are for dedicated riders who continue to cycle even in ‘bad weather’.  For example road riding, anyone training for an event.

If you are going to be outside in more extreme conditions, for instance, longer and more exposed riding, then a hardshell with excellent waterproof capabilities is your best bet.  Think more isolated, back country riding where you have a responsibility to keep yourself safe.

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Jacket Fit & Care

Construction plays a big role in how well your jacket will perform.  Water can also get in through poorly sealed seams or zips, or via the collar or sleeves if they don’t fit correctly.

DWR treatments wear off over time, accelerated by abrasions (e.g. rubbing from a back pack) and some detergents.  This makes it really important to read all care & wash labels when you first get your jacket.  It may also need to be re-treated to maintain its water proof properties. If the treatment does wear off, the outer fabric no longer causes water to bead and will become saturated and heavy.  Absorbing water from both the external rain water and your internal sweat.

For more information see How to Wash a Bike Jacket

get Safe and goRide – Waterproof or Breathable – Bike Jackets Explained
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get Safe and goRide – Waterproof or Breathable – Bike Jackets Explained
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Thanks for reading. Used together our stories, resources & products support you to achieve and develop as a rider.

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The Best Bike Jacket for….

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The Best Bike Jacket for Cycling…

The Best Bike Jacket for Cycling…

If you are in the market for a new jacket a bike specific one could be a good option and a great investment to keep you riding.  What would be the best bike jacket for cycling?

Supporting you and your family to SMILE when you ride.

 

All bike jackets will be designed with a specific function or combination of functions in mind – keeping you dry, keeping you warm, deflecting the wind, making you more visible.  They will probably share some bike specific features like good pockets, reflective strips, vents for airflow.

Staying warm on a bike can be challenging as the temperatures drop following a change of season.  Combine this with rain and/or wind and being comfortable requires some planning and the right type of gear.  We would love to see you riding all season round but to do this in a way that makes you want to ride, or to keep you smiling while riding, you need protection.

Technical Terms Explained

 

Waterproof – Technically means that it is impermeable to water, no matter how much time it spends in water.  No water in or out. It will have a coating on the outer fabric along with fully taped seams (seam sealed, see photo) and it may have a built in membrane lining.

Resistant – This type of jacket will be able to resist the penetration of water to a certain degree but not entirely so is considered water resistant or water repellant or showerproof. It will often bead up rainwater, forming drops on the surface.

Breathability –  Is a measure of how quickly moisture vapour, generated from your body when you are exercising, is able to pass through a fabric from the inside to the outside environment.

For more detailed information on this important subject see Waterproof or Breathable – Bike Jackets Explained

Choose the correct chamois

 

To follow are a few types of bike jackets explained in more detail.  Hopefully this will help you choose a jacket that will match closely to the type of riding that you do most often.  Having more than one jacket is always an option as well…

The Best Bike Jacket for Cycling in Traffic
 

Town riding usually sees you in everyday style clothing as you do chores or commute to work.  Jackets will need to be waterproof to get you to where you are going and still be relatively dry… Choosing a long length or combining your jacket with waterproof pants is a great idea for committed commuters. An urban jacket should help with your visibility so choose a bright colour with lots of reflective elements.  For many cyclists it is important this type of jacket is light weight and packs down.  This makes it really easy to carry when it is not being worn.

Any bike jacket style can be best in category for visibility.  This is all about your colour choice and reflective stripping or bands.  Bright colours that will attract the attention of drivers include anything fluorescent, orange, yellow, green, bright blue or red.  Reflective materials are picked up by car lights in limited visibility weather or at night time.  These can be placed on the back or front of the jacket and piped around edging.

See our Visibility On The Bike page for lots of ideas…

Choose the correct chamois
The Best Bike Jacket for Warmth
 

A thermal or wind/chill protection style of jacket is a great choice for warmth  These types of jackets work well for days when you know it’s not going to rain but it’s still cold.  You may also be a recreation rider who only chooses to go out riding when the weather is relatively good.  Look for warm fabrics, built up neck protection & zips finishing under you chin.  Any additional windproof protection through the chest area is also a bonus.  Known as soft shell jackets, they offer water resistance, breathability and warmth. Great as a lightweight outer layer or a breathable mid-layer.  This is a jacket for people who do not intend to ride in the rain.

thermal bike jacket
The Best Bike Jacket to Carry
 

A jacket that is lightweight and easy to carry can be a great addition to your cycling wardrobe.  These jackets will provide a wind block and be water resistant so can be worn for a variety of different reasons.  Most will pack down into a pocket making them extremely easy to take with you incase you need some extra protection while riding.  A vest can also be a good choice in this category. 

thermal bike jacket
The Best Bike Jacket for Dependable Performance
 

When you plan to ride your bike into places that are remote you need to have performance level bike gear that will keep you safe.  A waterproof jacket for protection against being wet is essential.  Because you will be working on your bike – in these types of locations – breathability is key to keeping you dry on the inside of the jacket as well.  This balance of waterproof yet breathable is a fine balance that many jackets do not achieve.  So know what you are buying. This jacket will use a 3-layer construction with a durable face fabric that will be very resilient in a wide range of conditions.  Seam & zip sealing becomes very important.

It will also need to pack down well so it is easy to carry.  These jackets are generally expensive.  They will have many added features like seam sealing, zippers for venting & waterproof fabric treatments/membranes with high ratings.

Choose the correct chamois
Be Safe – Signs of Hyperthermia

 

If you are bike touring in conditions with a significant Cold Challenge – Temperature, Wetness, Wind combined with fatigue, poor food intake and/or dehydration you need to be aware of the risk of mild hypothermia

  • Watch for the “Umbles” – stumbles, mumbles, fumbles, and grumbles which show changes in motor coordination and levels of consciousness
  • Shivering – not under voluntary control, not easily stopped
  • Can’t do complex motor functions (single track riding) can still walk & talk
  • Numbness in periphery (hands, feet)

Heat Retention + Heat Production is less than Cold Challenge = Hypothermia

What can you do for mild hypothermia?
 
  1. Reduce heat loss by adding layers of clothing, getting dry clothing on, increasing physical activity or providing shelter.  Use a survival blanket
  2. Add fuel & fluids. It is essential to keep a hypothermic person adequately hydrated and fuelled
  3. Add Heat – Fire or other external heat source.  Body to body contact. Get into a sleeping bag, in dry clothing with a normo-thermic person in lightweight dry clothing

(Source: Outdoor Action Guide to Hypothermia & Cold Weather Injuries.  By Rick Curtis)

This advice gives you a starting place to help someone who has injured themselves or is showing signs of mild hypothermia.  Nothing replaces training, so if no-one in your group has training or a medical background consider adding this to your list of things to “get better” at before you go bike touring or on multi day adventures.

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Your bike riding success is different to others… use our stories and support, get the right solutions.

Support and inspire other riders and families to ride

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The Best Bike Helmet for Kids who Mountain Bike

The Best Bike Helmet for Kids who Mountain Bike

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The mountain bike trail network is expanding. Most regions have trails to support the recreation/sport of mountain biking and these trails are catering for wider capabilities and a wider age range. This offers kids the opportunity to be exposed to mountain biking at a younger age. To keep kids safe as they learn and develop in the recreation/sport of mountain biking its imperative that we match their level of performance on the mountain bike trails with the appropriate equipment.

A priority is having a bike helmet to match their level of performance on the bike.

The BEST bike helmet for kids who mountain bike should mimic features of an adult mountain bike helmet. It needs to have features that will provide a similar performance level of protection.

Please note: you will need to consider an adult mountain bike helmet when their level of performance or their head size is not compatible with a kids bike helmet. See Mountain Biking Helmets for more information.

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GiroTremor performance features story goRide
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KEY DESIGN FEATURES to support SAFETY in a Mountain Bike Environment

A performance bike helmet with performance features for kids who mountain bike is important.

Performance protection & strength – Kids are riding in environments and at speeds similar to adults… so they need to ride wearing a helmet that has a similar level of protection to an adult mountain bike helmet. A kids mountain bike helmet should include protection such as MIPs, an impact protection system, a high quality inner foam and a shell moulded to this foam to adequately absorb the forces they may be exposed to when riding.

Shape – The helmet needs to have good head coverage.  This means it should cover their head from above the eyebrows through to base of the head/start of the neck.

Adjustable – The helmet needs to fit snug to their head and have good adjustment with the straps and a superior, easy to use, rear adjustment system.  Kids need to be able to use this system every time they put the helmet on and understand why it’s important that their helmet is in a good, secure position.

Breathable – Kids will be working hard/performing while riding so good breathability and airflow with good venting is an important feature.

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goRide’s Bike Helmet for Kids who mountain Bike is…
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GIRO TREMOR, available in one size only 50-57cm
Light weight and good ventilation. Good head coverage with good adjustment. Performance protection to match performance in the mountain biking environment.
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get Safe and goRide –  The Best Bike Helmet for Kids who Mountain Bike 
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Thanks for reading. Used together our stories, resources & products support you to achieve and develop as a rider.

Related Resources:

Bike Helmets for Kids – What are the options?

The right Kids Bike Helmet?

goRide helps you find your riding SMILE.  Now it’s your turn….Contact goRide. Your thoughts, comments or feedback will make us SMILE.

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